Deceiving Consonant Geminations


It is just a quick note. We’ve talked about consonant gemination. What it means is that whenever you see two identical consonants, you double the length of the pronunciation.

However, there are certain words you should pay attention to. Such words look like they go under this category, but they really dont.

1. Words beginning with GY preceded by the co-verb MEG:

meg|gyullad (to catch fire)

meg|gyújt (to light)

meg|gyón (to confess)

meg|gyászol (to mourn)

meg|gyúr (to knead)

meg|gyaláz (to outrage, to abuse)

etc.

The G in MEG and the GY in such verbs are pronounced separately, NOT LIKE A DOUBLE GGY!

 

2. The demonstrative pronouns EZ (this), AZ (that) when coupled with the suffix HEZ, -HOZ:

ez + -hez = ehhez (to this)

az + -hoz = ahhoz (to that)

This is seemingly a consonant gemination, but it is really assimilation in writing. Both would require the consonants to be pronounced double as long, but this is an exception. That double H is pronounced as one consonant: ehez, ahoz.

 

3. Words ending in two consonants followed by -VAL, -VEL:

pénz + -vel = pénzzel (with money)

lánc + -val = lánccal (with chain)

kard + -val = karddal (with sword)

etc.

Due to assimilation in writing the V in -VAL, -VEL becomes the same as the last consonant in the word this suffix is attached to. It would be impossible to say those zz, cc, dd double as long, so we just say them as: pénzel, láncal, kardal.

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